Easter Tradition Origins

Have you ever wondered why we have an Easter Bunny when rabbits don’t lay eggs? Wouldn’t it make more sense to have an Easter Chicken? And come to think of it, why do we dye eggs for Easter? And what does candy have to do with any of it? Here are some interesting tidbits on why we celebrate Easter the way we do. 

About the bunny…

We can thank Germany for the Easter Bunny (a.k.a. ““Oschter Haws”). In Germany, children build nests for the egg-laying hare to leave its decorated eggs in. As with Christmas, carrots are left out for a complimentary snack. When immigrants made their way to the U.S. in the 1700s, they brought this fun folk tradition with them and it quickly spread throughout the country with a few tweaks here and there. The nest evolved into a fancy grass-filled Easter basket and oodles of candy and treats were added. 

What’s with all the candy…

Easter used to be pretty low-key when it came to sweet treats. Families would enjoy their dyed eggs, a slice of mouthwatering lamb, and perhaps a hot cross bun. Then in the 1800s, European candy makers started creating festive goodies like chocolate bunny molds. It wasn’t until the 20th century when manufacturing innovations allowed candy makers to produce Easter-themed treats on a much larger scale that Easter candy became the massive billion dollar market that it is today. Halloween still holds first place.

Dying eggs…

Eggs represent new life, rebirth, and fertility in several cultures throughout the world. In Christianity, eggs symbolize the resurrection of Jesus Christ. In the Orthodox and Eastern Catholic churches, the eggs are painted bright red to represent the blood of Christ. Egg dying has gotten super creative over the years and there are now kits featuring stencils, stickers, glitter, and pretty much anything else our creative hearts desire. 

Visit us on Pinterest for Easter recipes and crafts! 

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